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  • A Wide Variety of Clubs and Organizations

    to help students grow.
  • Loyalty, Honor, Perseverance

  • A Diverse Academic Program

    including the performing and visual arts.
  • Excelling in the Classroom

    and on the stage, court, and field.
  • Preparing Students

    to become well diversed.

Admissions

We appreciate your interest in Trinity-Byrnes and invite you to learn more about our academic vision and admissions process.

Academics

Trinity-Byrnes is an elite college preparatory school offering middle and high school students a rigorous yet flexible academic curriculum.

International

The international dimension is important to us. We believe it's our responsibility to make sure our students engage with the world.

Arts

Trinity-Byrnes offers students a robust and diverse arts program including courses in dance, drama, music, and visual arts.

Athletics

We offer 16 varsity and JV teams for students to choose from during all seasons. Learn more about our athletic program here.

History

Trinity-Byrnes has been one of the top private schools in Florence, SC for over 20 years. We invite you to view our history.

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Upper School

upper school

Upper school students (grades 9-12) are offered a diverse curriculum of math, science, English, foreign languages and social studies, as well as a broad offering in the creative arts. The goal of our upper school is to help students prepare for college by providing them with a second-to-none education in an environment that promotes critical thinking, global literacy, leadership, and character. 

View the course guide here.

View our academic profile here.


The following courses are offered at the upper school level:

Upper School Art/Music Courses

Studio Art 1 (CP)

Studio Art offers the high school student an introduction to the four major components of Art (Artistic Perception, Creative Expression, Historical and Cultural Context and Aesthetic Valuing), with a heavy emphasis on Creative Expression. Students will keep a journal in which they record ideas, sketches, vocabulary, criteria and information in a creative way. They will produce several works of art throughout the year that reflect their own personal viewpoints while exploring all types of media in a studio environment.

Studio Art 2 (H)

The course aims to give each student an advanced degree of exposure to the components of art while they develop further their skills in given media areas in an appropriate studio environment. Only those students who have completed Studio Art 1 may take this next level of Studio Art.

Prerequisite: successful completion of Studio Art 1 or permission of teacher.

Ceramics (CP)

Ceramics provides the opportunity for kinesthetic learners to get their hands dirty. Ceramics takes art and design off the page and into the three dimensional world. Creating art in the third dimension teaches problem-solving skills using a hands-on approach. This course will teach students about the ceramic process, from Kneading the clay until the final glaze fire. This course will also cover the history of ceramics, measuring and planning in 3D, different types of clay, and clay building techniques.

Prerequisite: successful completion of Studio Art 1 or permission of teacher.

Introduction to Photography (S) (CP)

This semester-long class is an introduction to the use of DSLR cameras and editing software to create aesthetically pleasing photographs. After a general outline of the parts of a camera and the definition of its settings, much emphasis will be put on the use and arrangement of the elements and principles of art to compose chosen subject matter artistically. History, theory and concepts of Photography will also be explored in this course. Assuming that you should use the camera that is most available to you, use of iPads and iPhones will also be a major component of the course. For additional credit, students may also elect to take photographs for Yearbook.

Prerequisites: successful completion of Studio Art 1 and permission of teacher.

Art Portfolio/Art 3 (S) (Honors)

This class is designed to allow students to further develop the skills of their chosen media as well as beginning to conceptualize the content of their work. Part of the focus of the course is to allow students to begin to experience a more realistic studio environment where they are allowed more freedom to explore with the instructor as a guide.

Prerequisites: successful completion of Studio Art 2 and permission of teacher.

Graphic Design (Honors)

This class is designed to allow students to further develop the skills of their chosen media as well as beginning to conceptualize the content of their work. Part of the focus of the course is to allow students to begin to experience a more realistic studio environment where they are allowed more freedom to explore with the instructor as a guide. This course will make extensive use of design apps in Adobe Creative Suite.

Prerequisites: successful completion of Studio Art 1 OR Being Digital.

Dance 1 (CP)

To purpose of this course is to introduce students to dance, its history, its evolution, its impact on society and vice versa, and the importance of the Fine Arts in our culture. Students will acquire knowledge of the body’s skeletal, muscular, and nervous system and will discover musical knowledge and the limitless possibilities music provides. The course includes work on several performance pieces. No previous experience in dance is required, and boys as well as girls are encouraged to enroll in this class. All students are expected to participate in a dance performance. Course credit in Dance can be applied to upper school requirements in either Arts or Physical Education.

Dance 2 & 3 (Honors)

Aimed at students who already have experience in dance either at school or outside, Dance 2 is a course designed to enhance and develop previous dance technique and composition. Course credit in Dance can be applied to requirements in either Arts or Physical Education. All students are expected to participate in a dance performance. This is an Honors level course emphasizing creativity and artistic choreographic skills. Students will discover the art of teaching class as well as organizing, casting, and rehearsing a dance performance.

Prerequisites: Students who have taken Dance 2 may, with teacher approval, take Dance 3.

Drama (Honors)

In this year-long course students are provided with an advanced study in all areas of acting and stage production. This course includes study of Stage Directions, Parts of the Stage, Movement of the Actor, Positioning of the Actor, Improvisation, Scene Building through Content-less Scenes, and Stanislavsky Method Exercises. All students are expected to participate in a large theatrical production.

Upper School Music Ensemble (Honors)

A performing ensemble whose focus and style of music will be dependent upon the students in the class. Basic proficiency on an instrument is required. Participants will prepare to play a variety of music for school functions and the community. The aims of this course include for students to grow as musicians, to learn some music theory, to ROCK!

Upper School Computer Science/Technology

Being Digital (S) (CP)

This is our introductory technology course that gives students a good foundation in computer skills and applications. Being Digital is intended for freshmen and sophomores and covers review/mastery of office applications (MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, and equivalent Mac applications) and Google apps), & Adobe Creative Suite. Students will also be able to explore social media, and a range of other digital applications.

Introduction to Digital Cinematography (S) (CP)

This course is an introduction to visual media in the art of filmmaking. Students will explore the technical foundation of visual storytelling through the elements of professional camera operation, lighting, camera effects, story boards, shot sheets, casting, direction, sound effects, music scoring, and editing. Students will learn the technical skills needed to harness the medium of cinematography using Adobe Premiere Elements. Short video pieces will be assigned, and students will prepare the footage for editing, applying the theoretical, technical, and practical knowledge gained from the course. Some classical and contemporary film clips will be viewed and studied for technical application. Students will learn to use the camera in effective storytelling, and how to invoke emotion from an audience through images.

Prerequisites: Being Digital

AP Computer Science A

Computer Science A emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with an emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester course in computer science. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction. Students will learn to design and implement computer programs that solve problems relevant to today’s society, including art, media, and engineering, and will learn to apply programming tools and solve complex problems through hands-on experiences and examples.

Prerequisites: 85 in Algebra 2 (H)

Yearbook (Honors)

This elective involves preparing the school's yearbook for publication. Students will be exposed to journalism, editing, page layout, composition, photography, and other skills. When work on the yearbook is complete, the course work will turn to other areas of digital publication. Although Yearbook carries a full elective credit, 0.5 course credit in Yearbook may be applied to requirements for either Computer Science/Technology or Creative Arts. Those students interested in taking only a semester of Yearbook may choose to focus on sales & marketing in the Fall semester, or design & layout in the Spring.

Prerequisites: teacher approval based on student experience and/or marketing/layout skills

Upper School English

English 1 Honors or CP

Students in English I will read and analyze four major types of literary texts: fiction, literary non-fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will also create written work that has a clear focus, sufficient detail, coherent organization, effective use of voice, and core use of standard American English. They will build vocabulary by word analysis and vocabulary strategies while focusing on specialized and academic vocabulary. They will also access and use information from a variety of sources for research purposes.

English 2 - Introduction to Literary Forms (Honors or CP)

In this class, taken predominantly by 9th graders, students will expand their skills in reading and analyzing literature, writing, and research. Students in English 2 will read and analyze four major types of literary texts: fiction, literary nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Students will also create written work that has a clear focus, sufficient detail, coherent organization, effective use of voice, and core use of standard American English. They will build vocabulary by word analysis and vocabulary strategies while focusing on specialized and academic vocabulary. They will also access and use information from a variety of sources for research purposes.

Prerequisite: CP requires successful completion of English 1. Honors requires a minimum grade of B in English 1 Honors; students with a 90 or above in English 1 CP may, with teacher recommendation, request English 2 Honors.

English 3 - American Literature (Honors or CP)

This is our standard 10th grade course, offered at either Honors or CP level. In this course, students will study selected literary works such as novels, plays, nonfiction, and poetry primarily by American authors and may include selections from the anthology as well as Hawthorne, Crane, Remarque, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Miller, and Faulkner. Students will also study vocabulary, public speaking, and the research paper process. Students will continue to review elements of grammar and composition.

Prerequisite: Honors requires a minimum grade of B in English 2 Honors; students with a 90 or above in English 2 CP may, with teacher recommendation, request English 3 Honors. CP requires successful completion of English 2.

English 4 - British Literature (Honors or CP)

This course is offered at Honors or CP level for Juniors and Seniors. British Literature traces the evolution of the English language from Old English to Modern English through a study of the literature of each historical period. The course also emphasizes vocabulary, grammar, and composition.

Prerequisite: Honors requires a minimum grade of B in English 3 Honors; students with a 90 or above in English 3 CP may, with teacher recommendation, request English 4 Honors. CP requires successful completion of English 3.

AP English Language & Composition

The AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions between a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course may be taken either Junior or Senior year if a student has met the pre-requisites and has a teacher recommendation.

Prerequisite: Strong performance in English 1-3/4 - usually a minimum of 90 - and the recommendation of the instructor. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

AP English Literature & Composition

The AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone. This course may be taken either Junior or Senior year if a student has met the pre-requisites and has a teacher recommendation. The May AP test is required for all students to earn AP credit for this course.

Pre-requisite: Strong performance in English 1-3/4 - usually a minimum of 90 - and the recommendation of the instructor. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

Contemporary Literary Themes Honors

This Junior or Senior course explores major themes in contemporary works of literature. Students will read, discuss, and analyze literary selections. They will examine author’s techniques, research, and write about a variety of works including literature from different cultures, authors and societies. The course will help students become more culturally literate and globally aware while developing vocabulary, reading, comprehension, and composition skills

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 4.

Composition (9th & 10th grade)

This course provides students with the rhetorical foundations that prepare them for the demands of academic and professional writing. In this course, students will learn and practice the strategies and processes that successful writers employ, as they work to accomplish specific purposes. These purposes include comprehension, instruction, entertainment, persuasion, investigation, problem-resolution, evaluation, explanation, and refutation. In addition to preparing students for academic communication, this course prepares students to use writing to realize academic, professional and personal goals. Accordingly, class discussion and readings will address the function of rhetoric and of composing processes in a variety of contexts, with attention to various audiences. Throughout the course, while engaged in a diversity of composing endeavors, students will learn to respond constructively to their peers’ texts and to use peer responses (along with extensive instructor feedback) to improve the quality of their own work. This course will embed the teaching of grammar along with composition to prepare students to be strong, critical writers.

Semester Courses

Two semester-long elective English classes must be chosen if they are to replace a full-year class. These English courses may, however, also be taken as well as a regular English selection for additional or elective credit. Please note: not all of these courses will be offered in one academic year, but students are encouraged to request those that are of interest to them.

Public Speaking (S) (9th & 10th grade)

This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Students will learn about rhetorical strategies that strengthen speeches. Students will refine their research process evaluating source legitimacy and reliability. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. Students should also demonstrate the speaking, listening, and interpersonal skills necessary to be effective communicators in academic settings, in the workplace, and in the community. This class will prepare students for both discussions and presentations at the college level and beyond.

Creative Writing (Honors) (S)

Creative writing is designed to aid students in their creative expression, as well as delivery of one’s writing. Students will read and discuss articles on the craft of writing. The first quarter will focus on fiction. Students will read and evaluate the effectiveness of fiction of varying styles. They will write and workshop short stories to complete a final portfolio. The second quarter will focus on poetry. Students will learn poetic vocabulary and read interpret poems of varying styles. Students will write and workshop each other’s poetry to complete a final portfolio at the end of the quarter. Students will be expected to deliver their writing to an audience.

Film Studies 11/12th Grade (Honors) (S)

This course examines the interaction of film and literary texts, and the qualities of each. During the semester we will consider what happens when a variety of short stories, novels, or plays are made into a film; if we approach film and literary texts differently; and how we view and read these texts. We will also consider the cultures out of which the texts come: Does it make a difference if the work was written in 1789 or 1934 and filmed in 2011, or if the story was written by an Argentinian, and filmed in London by an Italian director? This course will be useful to anyone who has an interest in learning more about films and literature in general, screenwriting, how the written word is translated to the screen, how the written word in another language is translated (first in print, then to the screen), and cultural and historical aspects of adaptation. No background in film studies is needed for this course. You will, however, be asked to look at and think about films more reflectively than some of you have in the past. We will read about and view the films from a variety of perspectives; your responses to these texts and close viewing and reading of the texts will be important components of this class.

Seminar: World Literature (Honors) (S)

Students will engage in the reading of works from a variety of places and perspectives to understand how universal themes span culture and time periods. Through the use of a variety of mentor texts and supplemental works (novels, short stories, poems, articles, etc.), students will further develop their ability to interpret and analyze literary and informational selections. Students continue to develop refined, precise writing skills and write literary analyses, arguments, and narrative pieces, focusing on the skills of topic development, organization, diction/syntax, and the use of textual evidence. Grammar is addressed through writing to emphasize the finer points of mechanics and word choice, and vocabulary is drawn from both the readings and from other sources. Students will prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations to express their ideas and learn from/build on the ideas of others. They will formally and informally present their knowledge and ideas, utilizing various forms of digital media to enhance their message. This course is an integral part of preparing students to become global citizens.

Seminar: Young Adult Lit (S) (9th & 10th grade)

This course focuses on literature/genres written for and marketed to adolescents including literature that focuses on diverse cultures. We will read and discuss books related to gender, dystopic visions, cultural diversity, friendship, coming of age, voice and silence, difference, sexual and cultural identity, technology, race and class, and a range of other social and psychological themes. Students will share responsibility for facilitating discussion of the texts. In addition, the course will include a multimedia approach to literature where we will view several different variations of the same work. This course will focus on analyzing what makes the genre of YA literature unique in its own right.

Seminar: African American Literature (Honors) (S)

This course will examine the significance of an African American literary tradition in the specific context of the contemporary American and global worlds. We will begin by positioning African American literature within an American literary history. We will look at African American literature both as a literary tradition in its own right and as a lens through which we can better see contemporary African American culture and American culture as a whole. These cultural texts will allow us to see the ways in which African Americans have contributed to, have been influenced by, and have transformed America, and continue to do so. We will also closely consider verbal and literary modes, including: African retentions, oral traditions, signifying, folklore, and music, as well as their evolutions and how they have created a uniquely African American literary voice and how that voice has transformed to fit this contemporary moment. In an effort to critically map the trajectories of contemporary African American literature we will be interrogating not only the historical and political contexts of the works, but also the ways in which issues of gender, sexuality, and class specifically inform the works.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 3.

Seminar: Southern Literature (Honors) (S)

This course is focused on Southern writers, Southern literature, and Southern culture. However, these texts cover a wide variety of themes and topics that we will explore in discussion, presentations, and written assignments. Indeed, some questions we will explore include: What is the South? Where does our notion of the South come from? Is there such a thing as Southern literature? We will examine texts from and about the U. S. South in the context of their cultures, paying particular attention to themes, trends, movements, and commonalities of style. Lectures will be kept to a minimum and students will be expected to lead the class discussions on occasion and to participate in discussions regularly.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 3.

Seminar: Major Authors (Honors) (S)

A critical study of the work of a single author, such as Jane Austen, The Bronte Sisters, William Blake, Langston Hughes, Toni Morrison, Walt Whitman, Charles Dickens, William Faulkner, Kurt Vonnegut. Special attention given to biography, culture, and literary context. This seminar experience includes lectures, discussions, in-class writing, techniques for drafting, developing, shaping, revising, and editing work, supportive feedback, and individual meetings for the development of significant projects and for the assessment of work, with class time divided accordingly. This class provides an intensive engagement with one author’s life and work and uses this engagement as a lens through which to examine literary and cultural issues. This class should not be a survey of the author’s literary output; instead it should focus on the representative works to facilitate more sustained engagement with the ideas that animate the author’s work.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 3.

 

Upper School Mathematics

Algebra 1 - Honors or CP

Students may enter Algebra 1 after taking either Pre-Algebra or Math 8. It may be taken in 8th grade for Honors credit, or at CP level in 9th grade. Algebra 1 introduces basic algebraic skills and concepts focusing on mathematical problem solving. It includes operations with real numbers, simplifying expressions, evaluating and solving equations and inequalities, linear graphs, functions, polynomials, and factoring. Algebra 1 is a pre-requisite for Geometry.

Prerequisite: Honors requires a minimum grade of 85 in Pre-Algebra. CP has no prerequisite

Geometry - Honors or CP

Students take Geometry after completing Algebra 1. This course is concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space. It covers the basic language and concepts of geometric logic, as well as geometric transformations and coordinate systems, and two-column proofs.

Prerequisite: Honors requires a minimum grade of 85 in Algebra 1 Honors; students with a 90 or above in Algebra 1 CP may, with teacher recommendation, request Geometry Honors. CP requires successful completion of Algebra 1.

Algebra 2 - Honors or CP

This course is designed to build on algebraic and geometric concepts. It develops advanced algebra skills such as systems of equations, advanced polynomials, imaginary and complex numbers, quadratics, and it also introduces matrices and their properties. Students on an honors track generally proceed as Juniors to Precalculus Honors after Geometry Honors.

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 & Geometry. Honors requires a minimum grade of 85 in Geometry Honors; students with a 90 or above in Geometry CP may, with teacher recommendation, request Algebra 2 Honors.

Precalculus Honors

This course is for students with strong ability in math and will prepare them for college and AP Calculus AB should they choose. Precalculus combines the trigonometric, geometric and algebraic techniques needed to prepare students for calculus, and strengthens students’ conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems. It is the study of advanced functions, including higher-degree polynomials, rational functions, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric. Students in Precalculus Honors can take either AP Calculus (AB) or AP Statistics as seniors. The choice should be based on math ability and performance in Precalculus, preparation necessary for future studies, and interest. A Texas Instrument graphing calculator is required for this course.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 85 in Algebra 2 Honors and teacher recommendation. Students with a 90 or above in Algebra 2 CP may, with teacher recommendation, request Precalculus Honors.

Discrete Math (CP or Honors)

Discrete Math provides a general survey of mathematical topics (functions, statistics, probability, logic, algebra, geometry, business math, etc.) that are useful in the contemporary world while strengthening students’ knowledge of fundamental mathematics. Students will develop the ability to understand and reason with quantitative issues and mathematical ideas they are likely to encounter in college, career, and adult life. The course follows after Algebra 2 and provides an option (along with AP/Honors Statistics) for a fourth year of fundamental mathematics for those students who are not going to pursue a college major that requires Calculus.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 (CP) or an 85 plus teacher recommendation in Algebra 2 Honors (Honors).

Statistics (Honors)

This is an honors level course which is designed to walk students through the process of gathering data, describing it graphically and analytically, making inferences and testing hypotheses with the data, and communicating their results clearly and accurately at each step of the process. Students cover the four major themes in statistics: exploratory analysis, planning data production, probability, and statistical inference.

Prerequisite: completion of Algebra 2 Honors.

AP Calculus (AB)

The course covers the theory and application of the derivative and its interpretation as an instantaneous rate of change using numerical, graphical and analytical approaches. The theory of the definite integral and antiderivatives is developed with strong focus on applications in geometry and physics. The course follows the College Board curriculum in order to adequately prepare students to take the AP examination, which is required for the completion of the course. A Texas Instrument graphing calculator is required for this course.

Prerequisite: A minimum grade of 90 in Precalculus Honors and teacher recommendation. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

AP Calculus (BC) / Calculus 3 (Multivariable)

AB Calculus is a prerequisite. This course begins with advanced integral techniques and covers applications of the integral, sequences, series, Taylor series and vectors. In the second semester students begin multivariable calculus. Students will be required to take the AP Calculus BC examination. A Texas Instrument graphing calculator is required for this course.

Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB and teacher recommendation. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

AP Statistics

This is an Advanced Placement college level course which is designed to walk students through the process of gathering data, describing it graphically and analytically, making inferences and testing hypotheses with the data, and communicating their results clearly and accurately at each step of the process. Students cover the four major themes in statistics: exploratory analysis, planning data production, probability, and statistical inference.

Prerequisite: A minimum grade of 85 in Algebra 2 Honors and teacher recommendation. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

AP Computer Science A

Computer Science A emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with an emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester course in computer science. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction. Students will learn to design and implement computer programs that solve problems relevant to today’s society, including art, media, and engineering, and will learn to apply programming tools and solve complex problems through hands-on experiences and examples. The course focuses on structured algorithmic development using the Java programming language to solve problems. It is not about gaming or computer hardware. Programming methodology is emphasized, including the study of data structures, program design and data abstraction techniques. This course counts as a math or computer science credit.

Prerequisite: 85 in Algebra 2 (H)

Upper School Science

Conceptual Physics (CP)

Conceptual Physics is a one-year laboratory science designed for college preparatory students. It will de-emphasize the mathematics, but not eliminate it. The course will provide studies in the following areas: motion and its causes, conservation laws, periodic motion, thermodynamics and heat theory, electricity, magnetism, and electromagnetic radiation, light and optics, and modern physics including fundamental particles. The laboratory section of this course is designed to develop investigative skill as well as problem solving and independent critical thinking.

Biology (Honors)

Biology is usually offered as a 9th grade lab science. The course includes the following topics: cells, genetics, heredity, evolution, and a survey of the diversity of species. Students are introduced to basic biological concepts. Students cultivate creative thinking skills to apply these concepts to real life. 

Chemistry (CP or Honors)

Chemistry follows in sequence after Biology. This course includes the study of atomic structure, matter and energy, chemical formulas and reactions, acids and bases, and gases. Students in Chemistry CP should ideally be enrolled in Algebra 2 to be able to master the mathematical demands of the course. Skills such as note taking and problem solving will be stressed. The student will be taught laboratory methods used in the sciences to evaluate observations, knowledge and ideas.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Conceptual Physics for CP. For Honors, a grade of B or better in Geometry and a grade of B or better in Honors Biology. Exceptions will be made with a teacher recommendation from one of these courses.

Physics (Honors)

Generally taken after students have completed Honors Chemistry, Physics topics include Kinematics, Newton’s Laws, Energy, Fluid Mechanics, Heat, Light/Optics, Thermodynamics, Sound, Electricity, Waves, and Magnetism. Due to the expectation of competency with math, students wishing to take Honors Physics should have already completed Algebra 2.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry and Algebra 2.

Biology 2 Honors/AP Biology

This lab course is offered to motivated students who wish to delve deeper into the life sciences. Emphasis will be on cell biology, genetics, evolution and the diversity of organisms. This advanced lab science course in Biology will prepare junior and senior students to take the AP Biology Exam and the SAT II Biology subject test. The course is tentatively scheduled to carry dual enrollment credit from Coker College. Students may opt out of the AP Biology exam in May 2018.

Prerequisites: a grade of B+ (85%) in Biology and Chemistry.

Anatomy & Physiology (Honors)

This elective is an introductory course of human anatomy and physiology, designed to introduce students to the complexities of the human body structure and function and provide them with a solid foundation for future studies in science and medicine.

Prerequisite: successful completion of Biology and Chemistry

Semester Science Electives

Marine Biology - I (S) (Honors)

Marine Biology I is a semester-long science elective for junior and senior students. The course focuses on ocean habitats and the physical forces that shape them. Students will have a better understanding of plate tectonics, waves, tides, and climate; simple marine life and plants upon completion of the course. The course uses a variety of teaching formats, lecture slides, textbook readings, science videos, lab experiences and field trips.

Prerequisite: successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Marine Biology - II (S) (Honors)

Marine Biology II is a semester long science elective for junior and senior students. The Marine Biology II course encompasses the study of marine life. Students will study the Phyla represented in the Animal Kingdom and the interdependence of these organisms during second semester. The course uses a variety of teaching formats and there are dissection labs included. Marine Biology is designed to be challenging but not overwhelming to the average junior/ senior level science student and assumes prior completion of both Biology and Chemistry.

Prerequisite: successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Forensic Science - I (S) (Honors)

Introduction to Forensic Sciences is the first semester science elective for students who have completed Biology and Chemistry courses. The first semester will include a history of forensic science, processing methods of trace evidence (serology, fingerprinting, etc.) and forensic psychology

Forensic Science - II (S) (Honors)

The second semester of Forensic Sciences will focus primarily on chemical evaluation of evidence. Labs offered will include applied chemical methods in inorganic, organic and biochemical techniques.

Prerequisite: successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Nutrition and Food Science (S) (Honors)

Food is essential for maintaining the physical and psychological needs of the human body. Food Science and Nutrition explores these needs along with how personal food selection is impacted by social, regional, and religious customs. Classroom experiments demonstrate unique taste perceptions and how visual discernment manipulates taste.

Prerequisite: successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Astronomy (S) (Honors)

This course introduces you to the composition and structure of the universe. Astronomy is the scientific study of the contents of the entire Universe. This is a Non-Laboratory Course that provides the student with a study of the universe and the conditions, properties, and motions of bodies in space. The content includes, but is not limited to, historical astronomy, astronomical instruments, the celestial sphere, the solar system, the earth as a system in space, the earth/ moon system, the sun as a star, and stars and galaxies.

Advanced Placement Chemistry

This course prepares students to take the College Board’s AP Chemistry exam in May. Honors chemistry is strongly recommended as a pre-requisite for this class. The AP Chemistry course focuses on a model of instruction which promotes enduring, conceptual understandings and the content that supports them. This approach enables students to spend less time on factual recall and more time on inquiry-based learning of essential concepts, and helps them develop the reasoning skills necessary to engage in the science practices used throughout their study of AP Chemistry. This course is tentatively offered with dual enrollment college credit from Coker College.

Prerequisites: Students must have demonstrated their ability by earning a final grade of 90 or above in both Biology and Chemistry courses and have approval of the Science Department Coordinator.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science

The six themes of this course are: science as a process, energy in ecological processes, the earth as single interconnected system, human impact on natural systems, the social and cultural context of environmental problems, and human survival through sustainable systems. Project work emphasizing sustainability, energy resources and consumption, pollution, the six themes and global change are performed throughout the year. Students will take the APES exam in May. This course is tentatively offered with dual enrollment college credit from Coker College.

Prerequisites: Students must have demonstrated their ability by earning a final grade of 85% or higher in both Biology and Chemistry courses and have approval of the Science Department Coordinator.

Advanced Placement Physics 1

AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based is the equivalent of a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics, but it is designed to be taught over a full academic year to enable students to develop deep understanding of the content and to focus on applying their knowledge through inquiry labs. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It also introduces electric circuits. This course is tentatively offered with dual enrollment college credit from Coker College.

Prerequisites: students should have completed Geometry and be concurrently taking Algebra II or an equivalent course.

Upper School Social Studies

World History (Honors)

This year-long class will explore major themes in world history from the beginnings of “civilization” through the Cold War. The course material is anchored to geographical areas such as river valleys, plains, oceans, and mountain ranges. Themes include the importance of geography and climate on historical development, and transnational forces like migration, trade, empire-building, and cultural diffusion in producing historical change. Students will learn the basics of historical thinking by analyzing primary sources, researching historical questions, and reporting their research in thesis-driven essays and presentations to the class.

History of Afro-Eurasia - Modern Europe, Middle East & North Africa (Honors)

MEME is a course for 10th graders studies the shared modern history of the peoples of Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia, and Africa. In the fall semester, students study modern Europe from 1789 to the present. In so doing, they consider what it means to be "modern", and how European peoples have arrived at and reacted to the modern condition. In the spring semester, students will explore the history of the Middle East and North Africa since the advent of Islam. Here, they will study and challenge western stereotypes of "eastern" peoples. In both classes, students will sharpen their interpretations of primary sources, and enhance their research, writing, and public speaking skills.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History

US History (Honors or CP)

This 11th grade course is a survey of American history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Students will learn factual information as a basis for analysis and interpretation, as well as a number of important concepts and thematic patterns in history. They will also expand their skills in critical thinking, evaluation, synthesis, research, and writing. We will examine the political, diplomatic, economic, social, cultural, and myriad other factors that influenced America and Americans and that still resonate with Americans today.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History

Psychology Honors

The purpose of Honors Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental process of human beings. Students will learn about this science through lectures, assigned readings, research, dialogue, and projects.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History

Advanced Placement U.S. History

This course is a college-level survey of American history that prepares students to take the AP U.S. History exam in May. The course may be taken by 10th grade students who meet the pre-requisite PSAT score in Writing, who understand the level of reading and commitment required, and are recommended by current English and Social Studies teachers. APUSH is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. Students will learn to assess historical materials -their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance- and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.

Prerequisite: strong performance (>85) in previous social studies courses and teacher recommendation. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

Advanced Placement Psychology

The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Prerequisite: strong performance (>85) in previous social studies courses and teacher recommendation. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

Advanced Placement Art History

AP Art history emphasizes understanding works of art within their historical context by examining issues such as politics, class, religion, patronage, audience, gender, function, and ethnicity. The AP Art History course also teaches students how to understand works of art through both visual and contextual analysis. Students must have completed World History. Students who have taken Studio Art 2 and AP Modern European History will be well-prepared for this course.

Prerequisite: strong performance (>85) in previous social studies courses and teacher recommendation. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

Advanced Placement European History

This course is a college-level survey of European history from the height of the Renaissance through 2001 that prepares students to take the AP European History Exam in May. Students will learn factual information as a basis for analysis and interpretation, as well as a number of important concepts and thematic patterns in history. They will also expand their skills in critical thinking, evaluation, synthesis, research, and writing. We will examine the political, diplomatic, economic, social, cultural, and myriad other factors that influenced European development.

Prerequisite: strong performance (>85) in previous social studies courses and teacher recommendation. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

Advanced Placement Comparative Government

This course will cover International Relations and Comparative Government Theory and then apply that knowledge to the study of six countries: the United Kingdom, Russia, China, Mexico, Nigeria, and Iran. Students will study the history of political, social, and economic development in each of the six countries, the current structure of the governments, and the political culture and policy debates in those countries today. As this is an AP course, it will require a substantial amount of reading and written work, as well as some work over the summer.

Prerequisite: strong performance (>85) in previous social studies courses and teacher recommendation. Students must sit the AP exam in May.

Semester Courses (S)

Economics (S) (Honors)

This semester-long course explores an overview of both Macro and Micro Economics. This course will utilize guiding questions, projects, essays, tests, quizzes and various reading assignments to frame topics and to guide students through the learning experience towards an understanding of fundamental principles of economics. While not a requirement, it is strongly recommended that students take this course.

Philosophy (S) (Honors)

This semester-long course examines the fundamentals and history of Western philosophy and thought. Students will cover the major periods and ideas of Western thought and how those ideas influenced (and continue to influence) thought, culture, and life to this day.

U.S. Government (S) (Honors)

In this semester-long course we will examine the fundamentals of American government and politics, from its roots in the Constitution to today. Students will explore a variety of topics, both historical and current, and will keep up-to-date on current events and issues in American politics. We will also look closely at the structure and institutions of American government and how they operate. While not a requirement, it is strongly recommended that students take this course.

World Religions (S) (Honors)

World Religions is a semester-long survey of major religious systems: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Students will explore the beliefs, practices, and holy texts of these religions, and examine each's evolution through different historical eras. Essential class themes include the connections between religion and phenomena like gender, violence, ethics, world history, and modernity. To give students a feel for university-level course work, they will conduct original research and present their findings in an atmosphere mimicking an academic conference. This is a requirement for all students, and is usually taken in 11th or 12th grade, although students with strong writing skills and recommendation from current social studies teacher may take it in 10th grade if their schedule allows.

Global Connections/Perspectives (S) (Honors)

This semester-long discussion and project-based course provides opportunities for enquiry into, and reflection on, key global issues from a personal, local/national and global perspective. Young people globally face unprecedented challenges in an interconnected and information-heavy world, not least in how they will gain a sense of their own active place in the world and cope with changes that will impact on their life chances and life choices. Students will explore stimulating topics that have global significance. The course emphasizes the development and application of skills rather than the acquisition of knowledge. Perspectives is offered for 9th & 10th grade; Connections for 11th & 12th.

Upper School World Languages

Latin 1 (CP)

Intended for students who have taken Latin 1a in 7th grade, Level 1 Latin teaches comprehension of the Latin language through practice in reading through which students develop understanding of the social and political history of the Romans. Latin students from grade 7 to grade 9 will compete in the National Mythology exam.

Latin 2 (CP)

Students in Latin 2 will continue to read and gain a better understanding of Latin; they will recognize and use complex grammatical structures essential for translation and will research and report on specialized customs, classical occupations, and development of Roman government. Students also recognize and use elements of the Latin language to increase their knowledge of their own language. Latin students from grade 7 to grade 9 will compete in the National Mythology exam.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Latin 1

Latin 3 (Honors)

Students in Latin 3 will develop comprehension of the language, responding appropriately to more complex written Latin; they will compare classical customs with parallel modern day equivalents and will recognize the influence of the Romans on their own world and make comparisons. Students will also be able to determine the meaning of English vocabulary. Students will also learn Ancient Greek and compete in the National Greek Exam, as well as the National Mythology Exam.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Latin 2

Latin 4 (Honors)

Students will read authentic passages, prose and poetry, and study Roman literature and its influence on Western literature. Latin 4 Honors will prepare students for the AP course by studying specific authors and complex grammar.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Latin 3 and recommendation of teacher.

Latin 5 (Honors or AP)

Students will read, translate, understand, analyze and interpret lines of Caesar De Bello Gallico and Vergil’s Aeneid, and will be able to read and interpret passages at first sight. The AP Latin syllabus is rigorous in the development of these skills.

Prerequisites: Grade B or better in Latin 4 and recommendation of teacher.

French & Spanish 1/1a-b (CP)

French and Spanish 1 are taught primarily in the target language. In level 1, students will communicate on a variety of personal topics, such as family and friends, likes and dislikes, and classes. Students will speak the target language every day, in addition to developing skills in listening, reading, writing, and intercultural interactions. Students’ goal is to communicate at the Novice Mid proficiency level (ACTFL). Level 1 is offered at the middle and upper school level. Students who complete French or Spanish 1b in 8th grade will gain high school language 1 credit, counting towards the three year language graduation requirement.

French & Spanish 2 (CP)

French and Spanish 2 are taught primarily in the target language. In level 2, students will continue to develop their communication skills through navigating real life situations such as shopping, going to the doctor, and traveling. Students will speak in the target language every day and work with authentic resources, including websites, videos, and advertisements. Students’ goal is to communicate at the Novice High to Intermediate Low proficiency level (ACTFL).

Prerequisites: Successful completion of level 1 at TBCS or demonstrated writing and speaking skills for transfer students.

French & Spanish 3 (Honors or CP)

French and Spanish 3 are taught in the target language. In level 3, students will develop the skills to discuss personal topics in greater detail and with more complexity. Students will also learn to relate events in the past tense. Students will speak in the target language every day and begin to complete more complex interpretive tasks. Students’ goal is to communicate at the Intermediate Mid proficiency level (ACTFL).

Prerequisite: Successful completion of level 2 at TBCS or demonstrated writing and speaking skills for transfer students.

French & Spanish 4 (Honors)

French and Spanish 4 are taught exclusively in the target language and carry an honors credit. In level 4, students will communicate on a variety of personal topics and begin to discuss current issues, such as the environment. Students will speak at length and engage with complex authentic resources and relevant cultural texts. Students’ goal is to communicate at the Intermediate High to Advanced Low proficiency level (ACTFL).

Prerequisites: Successful completion of level 3 at TBCS or demonstrated writing and speaking skills for transfer students.

French & Spanish 5 (Honors)

French and Spanish 5 are exclusively taught in the target language and carry an honors credit. Students will communicate extensively in the language of instruction. In level 5, students will discuss a variety of global issues and current events through interaction with authentic readings, recordings and videos. This course provides initial preparation for AP French or Spanish in Level 6. Students’ goal is to communicate at the Advanced Low to Mid proficiency level (ACTFL).

Prerequisites: Successful completion of level 4 at TBCS or demonstrated writing and speaking skills for transfer students.

 

Tags: Curriculum

Trinity-Byrnes by the Numbers

Take a look at what makes our school exceptional.

8 1 student
9:1 student to
teacher ratio
14 average
14 average
class size
ap courses
15 
AP courses
sports
14 sports
programs
clubs and orgs
20 student clubs and organizations
graduation
100% of students accepted to
4 year colleges
Our Mission
To operate exclusively as a college preparatory school of academic excellence for grades 7-12, preparing our students intellectually, physically, socially, and spiritually to be well-rounded citizens able to lead productive lives in a global society.